List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (2023)

List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (1)

Idioms with Examples Pdf!

This post is about Idioms with Examples. Idioms Definition: “An idiom is a group of words established by usage as having a meaning not deducible from those of the individual words (e.g. Over the moon,see the light).” Idioms can reduce your speaking time and boost up your credibility of English speaking.

Most Interesting Idioms with Examples

We are providing idioms with examples and idioms with meaning. Using idioms in your daily conversation can boost up your vocabulary. Below is the list of idioms that you can use in your daily conversation.

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A simple idiom definition is, “a phrase, saying, or a group of words that has a metaphorical (not literal) meaning, which has become accepted in common usage.”

Idioms With Examples:

Here is the list of Idioms with Examples in English:

List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (2) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (3) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (4) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (5) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (6)

Idioms with Examples (1-20)

  • Come round or come around (agree): He will, at last, come around to our ideas.
  • Come to blows (fight): They may come to blows during their talk.
  • Cut no ice (have no influence or effect): His advice to Indians cut no advice to them.
  • Through thick and thin (under any condition): He will be with you through thick and thin.
  • Shed light on (make clear, explain): Let me throw light on the new plan
  • Time and again (again and again, repeatedly): She asks the same question time and again
  • Time and tide (time and chance): Time and tide wait for none.
  • To and fro (from side and side): They walk to and fro without knowing what to do.
  • To the backbone (completely, in all ways): He is a Pakistani to the backbone.
  • To the extent of (to that degree): You will get marks to the extent of your ability
  • To the full extent (in a complete way): We shall pay back your loan to the full extent.
  • Tom, dick and harry (anybody at all): Every tom dick and harry cannot attend this party.
  • Tongue and cheek (saying and doing something one does seriously mean): He said tongue and cheek that he was my best friend.
  • Tooth and nail (with full force): We shall oppose them in this matter tooth and nail.
  • Turn a deaf ear (refuse to listen to): He may turn a deaf ear to your request.
  • Turn down (not to accept): He may turn down your request.
  • Turn one’s back on (avoid): He will never turn his back upon you.
  • Turn out (happen to be in the end): She will turn out to be your great helper.
  • Turn off (stop the flow of electricity gas water): Please turn off the light.

Idioms Examples (20-40)

List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (7) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (8) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (9) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (10) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (11)

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  • Turn over a new leaf (begin a different way to life): Let’s turn over a new leaf and begins a new life.
  • Turn tail (to run away): A brave solider will never turn tail
  • Turn the table on (gain a position of advantage after having been defeated): You can easily turn the table on your enemies.
  • Turn turtle (turn upside down): This light boat can easily turn turtle
  • Turncoat (a person who changes his party or principle): I hate a turncoat in politics.
  • Turn up (arrive): Their guest will turn up soon.
  • Up and doing (be active): She is up and doing whenever I visit her.
  • Uphill task (uphill task): Removing corruption is an uphill task.
  • Up to the date (modern): Her clothes are up to date.
  • Up to the mark (equal to the required standard): Your homework is surely up to the mark.
  • Ups and downs (good and bad period): Life has its up and down for everyone.
  • Walk with God (pass a noble life): They walk with God, and their life is perfect.
  • Wash one’s hand off (say one is no longer responsible for): You cannot wash your hands on the mistakes of your children.
  • Weal and woe (good and bad fortune): I will stand by you in weal and woe.
  • Wear and tear (damage done by use): You can see the wear and tear on this old bus.
  • Well off (rich, lucky): His income is high, and he is a wet off.

List of Idioms with Examples in English (40-60)

List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (12) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (13) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (14) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (15) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (16)

  • Wet blanket (person who prevents others from enjoying themselves): He is a wet blanket.
  • Whatever else (anything else): Whatever else you may do, don’t play with him.
  • While away (pass time lazily): He wants to while away his time visiting new places.
  • Where the shoe pinches (where there is the real trouble): Only the wearer knows where the shoe pinches.
  • White elephant (costly or troublesome possession): This old car is just a white elephant for us.
  • Wild goose chase (foolish or useless activity): His search for a new bicycle is only a wild goose chase.
  • Win laurels (win honor): The able scientist will win laurels.
  • With a high hand (in a proud way): They should not treat another high handedly.
  • With a view to (with the intention of): We went to the stadium with a view of seeing the match.
  • With clean hands (in a pure condition): I want to leave this profession with clean hands.
  • Within a stone through (within a very short distance): His college is within a stone from his house.
  • With one’s back to the wall (be in great danger with no escape): He will fight on the end with his back to the wall.
  • With open arm (very gladly): We welcome our cricket team with an open arm.
  • Without reserves (freely and openly): She told me everything about her without reserve.
  • Wolf in sheep clothing (a person who looks harmless but is harmful): He says that he is your friend, but he is a wolf in sheep clothing.
  • Work out (to solve or find something by calculation): Place work out the time taken in boiling an egg.
  • Worked up (very excited): The new teacher is often worked up in the class.
  • Worry one’s salt (be worth what one is paid): They fired the servant because he was not worried about his salt.
  • Write off (cancel): The bank will not write off their loan.

List of Idioms with meaning and Examples (60-80)

List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (17) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (18) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (19) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (20) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (21)

  • Yeoman service (effective service): Our great leader gave yeoman service to the leader.
  • Take ill (mind): Do not take ill his honest words.
  • Take into account (take into consideration): Take into account his honesty while employing him.
  • Take off (remove the clothes, rise into the air): Our airplanes will take off at 9 am.
  • Takeover (take control of): Ali will take over as the new principal.
  • Take the bull by the horn (fight against difficulty): Take the bull by the horns fight against your enemies.
  • Take to (begin regularly): After retirement, he took to the carpet business.
  • Take to the heart (fell very sad over): Do not take your failure to heart.
  • Take to one’s heels (show a clean pair of heels=run away): Brave soldiers never take to their heels.
  • Take to the task (speak harshly to someone for a mistake): The officer will take him to task for his absence.
  • Take with a grain (not to believe readily): You can only take his story with a grain of salt.
  • Talk big (boast): They only talk big when they say that they can buy a house.
  • Talk shop (talk about one’s work): At a party, we should not talk shop.
  • Tell to one’s face (openly): I can tell his secrets to his face.
  • Thankless task (work which brings no thanks): It is just a thankless task to do anything for him.
  • Thanks to (as a result of): Thanks to the medicine I feel well now.
  • That is why (for this reason): He is ill that is why he is not here.
  • Thing big (plan to do a great deal): They plan to become a doctor they really think big.
  • Throw dust into one’s eye (to deceive): Do not throw dusk in my eyes by telling me the wrong price.
  • Throw mud at (speak badly of): Do not throw at him as he is an honest person
  • Through and through (in a thorough or complete way): We should learn our lesson through and through.
  • Speak one’s mind (express one’s thought directly): He will spread his mind at the meeting.
  • Speak up (speak loudly): Please speak up as I could not hear your voice.
  • Speak volumes for (show clearly): Your result speaks volumes for your ability.
  • Spick and span (neat and clean): They keep their room spick and span.
  • Spread like wildfire (spread very fast): The news of his dismissal spread like wildfire.
  • Stag party (a party for men before marriage): I attended his stag party at night.
  • Stand by (support): Your friend will always stand by you.

Idioms with Examples List (80-100)

List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (22)

  • Stand on (pay great attention to the rule of behavior): Do not stand on ceremony in this house.
  • Steal a march on (gain an advantage): Steal a march on him and open a shop before he does.
  • Steal one’s thunder (do better then): Sajid can steal her thunder at the debate.
  • Storm in teacup (great trouble for nothing): Their protest is only a storm in a teacup.
  • Strike while the iron is hot (use an occasion as soon as it comes): Get this chance and strike while the iron is hot.
  • Sum and substances (all that it means briefly): These points are the sum and substances of his speech.
  • Take a fancy to (begin like very much): Everyone will take a fancy to the film.
  • Take a leap into the dark (do something the result of which cannot be seen): Do not take a leap into the dark by entering politics.
  • Take aback (surprise and confused one): His sudden return from japan will take them back.
  • Take after (look and behave like an older relative): Robin takes after her mother.
  • Take for (consider): They take you for an arb.
  • Take heart (have courage): Take heart try again and you will pass.
  • Save something for rainy day (save for the future): We should have something for a rainy day.
  • Scot-free (completely free): The judge let the prisoner scot-free.
  • See eye to eye (agree completely): We see eye to eye in this matter.
  • See off (go to say good-by): We went to the station to see mother off.
  • Sell like hotcakes (sell very fast): Some newspapers sell like hot cakes.
  • Sell something off (sell a stock of goods cheaply): These shop will sell off their old clothes.
  • Send for (have one called): I have sent for the carpenter.
  • Set aside or apart (reserve for future use): He will set aside some land for his house.
  • Sight for sore eyes (a person or a thing one is happy to see at last): He is a slight for a sore eye for us on his return from war.

List of Idioms Examples in English (100-120)

  • Set free (allow someone to be free): These prisoners were at last set free by the new government.
  • Set in (begin and continue): The rainy season has set in.
  • Set out (start for): They set out for the mountain at the jeep.
  • Set off (begin a journey): They set off for the mountain at the jeep.
  • Set to (start doing something by effort): Just set to, and you write a homework
  • Set up (go in business as): The Quaid e Azam set up a layer in Bombay
  • Sick of (tired of): They are really sick of her daily visits to them.
  • Small talk (light conversation): It was all small talk at the party.
  • Smell a rat (guess that something wrong is happening): I smell a rat and fear they are planning against us.
  • Snake in the grass (a person who is secretly dangerous): Your friend is a snake in the grass.
  • So far as (as far as): So far as I know him, he is an innocent man.
  • Put up with (tolerate): Who can put up with such behavior?
  • Rank and file (the common people): The rank and file should be happy with life.
  • Red carpet (welcome to a guest): We gave the leader a red carpet welcome.
  • Red-letter day (a very important day): The 14th of august is a very red-letter day for Pakistanis.
  • Rely on (trust): You can always rely on his tested friend.
  • The reward for (prize): They will reward him for killing the loin.
  • Rise to occasion (show that one can do something important): The nation should rise to the occasion during the war.
  • Rolling stone (one who goes on changing): A rolling stone can never succeed.
  • Round up (catch criminal): The police will soon round up criminals.
  • Rough or raw deal (unfair treatment): It is a tough deal as you have not paid me the full salary.
  • Royal road (an easy way): There is no royal road to success.

Idioms with Examples (120-150)

  • Run across (meet or find by chance): Sometimes we run across old friends in the Market.
  • Run after (follow something or someone): We ran after the ball
  • Run amok (function in an uncontrolled way): Some people run amok when they are idle or tired.
  • Rundown (say unkind words about): Do not run down your friends
  • Run short (reach the end): We should not run short of money.
  • Run through (examine quickly): We run through our notes before examinations
  • Safe and sound (unharmed): Ali reached home safe and sound.
  • Pay through the nose (pay too much money for): I had to pay through the nose to buy this house.
  • Plain sailing (plan or action without difficulty): Business is plain sailing with a lot of money.
  • Play ducks and drakes (waste property or money): Do not play duck and drakes with your father’s property.
  • Play one’s trump card (make use of one most valuable resource): The Arabs can always play their trump card of oil.
  • Play second fiddle to (play a less important part then): He should not play second fiddle to others in the office.
  • Play the game (be fair and honest in one’s dealings): Play the game in your business.
  • Play with fire (take the great risk): To speak against him is to play with fire.
  • Pocket an insult (face an insult without saying anything about that): He had to pocket an insult when she turned him out.
  • Poison one’s ears (inform against someone): He may poison your hairs against me.
  • Proud of (): We are proud of our armed forces.
  • Pull someone’s leg (make fun of a person): It was to pull his leg that she offered to marry him.
  • Pull through (regain health): She is ill, but the doctor says that she will pull through.
  • Put a spoke in one’s wheel (stop a person from caring out his plan): They put a spoke in his wheel when they reported his plan to the police.
  • Put across (explain in a way that people understand): The teacher put across his lecture well.
  • Put aside by (save something for later use): We should put aside some money from our income.
  • Put back (return something in its proper place): We should put the tool back in the box after work.
  • Put on (dress oneself): She put on her best clothes for the party.

Infographics (List of Idioms with Examples)

List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (23)
List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (24)

List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (25) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (26) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (27) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (28) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (29) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (30) List of Idioms with Examples PDF – 150 Idioms List in English - MechMass (31)

Download this list of idioms with examples in PDF (Download PDF)

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FAQs

What is the idiom of A to Z? ›

Idiom: From A to Z

from A to Z: the entire range of something. including every step from start to finish. completely, to include everything and every detail.

What are the 50 idioms? ›

50 popular idioms to sound like a native speaker
IDIOMMEANING
Kill two birds with one stoneSolve two problems at once / with one action
Leave no stone unturnedDo everything possible to achieve a goal
Let the cat out of the bagAccidentially reveal a secret
Make a long story shortCome to the point
46 more rows
20 Mar 2017

What are 30 idioms? ›

The most common English idioms
IdiomMeaning
Beat around the bushAvoid saying what you mean, usually because it is uncomfortable
Better late than neverBetter to arrive late than not to come at all
Bite the bulletTo get something over with because it is inevitable
Break a legGood luck
33 more rows

What are the 25 idioms? ›

Let us now learn about the 25 most common and useful Idioms in the English language:
  • Under the weather. Meaning - To feel sick. ...
  • The ball is in your court. ...
  • Spill the beans. ...
  • Pull someone's leg. ...
  • Sit on the fence. ...
  • Through thick and thin. ...
  • Once in a blue moon. ...
  • The best of both worlds.
26 Jun 2021

What are the 20 examples of idiom? ›

Here are 20 English idioms that everyone should know:
  • Under the weather. What does it mean? ...
  • The ball is in your court. What does it mean? ...
  • Spill the beans. What does it mean? ...
  • Break a leg. What does it mean? ...
  • Pull someone's leg. What does it mean? ...
  • Sat on the fence. What does it mean? ...
  • Through thick and thin. ...
  • Once in a blue moon.
23 Feb 2022

What is idiom give 5 examples? ›

For example, “under the weather” is an idiom universally understood to mean sick or ill. If you say you're feeling “under the weather,” you don't literally mean that you're standing underneath the rain.

What are the 10 examples of idiomatic expressions with meaning? ›

10 idiomatic expressions with meaning and examples
  • Barrel of laugh: someone who is very funny.
  • Old as the hills: some who is very old.
  • In the doghouse: To have some unhappy with you.
  • Up for grabs: Available for anyone.
  • Split hairs: Argue or worry about small details.
  • Round the bend: Crazy, insane.
20 Jan 2022

What sentence uses all 26 letters? ›

An English pangram is a sentence that contains all 26 letters of the English alphabet. The most well known English pangram is probably “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog”.

How many idioms are in English? ›

How many idioms are there? Wikipedia suggests that there are over 25,000 idiomatic expressions in the English language.

Which sentence have A to Z alphabet? ›

The Answer: A sentence using all the letters in the alphabet is called a pangram (from the Greek for "every letter"). "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" is the most famous pangram, but there are many others.

What is an idiom 5th grade? ›

Idiom. An idiom is a phrase in which the meaning of each word separately does not tell the reader what the idiom means. In other words, the words in the phrase mean something more than each word in it.

What is idioms for kids? ›

An idiom is a group of words with a figurative, non-literal meaning which can't be deciphered by looking at its individual words. In many cases, idioms started off with literal meanings, but lost them as they moved away from their origins. A common example of an idiom is 'give up'.

What are idioms in English grammar? ›

What's an Idiom? Broadly speaking, an idiom is a widely used phrase that, when taken as a whole, has a particular meaning that you would not be able to deduce from the meanings of the individual words. The ubiquitous greeting “How are you doing today?” is an example of an idiom.

How can I learn English idioms? ›

6 Websites for Learning English Idioms
  1. The Phrase Finder. This website has a large number of American idiomatic expressions not only with their meanings but also with their origins. ...
  2. Vocabulary.co.il: Idioms and Slang. ...
  3. The Free Dictionary: Idioms and Phrases. ...
  4. Open English World. ...
  5. The Idiom Connection. ...
  6. Learn English Today.
20 Mar 2015

What are idioms and proverbs? ›

1. An idiom is defined as a phrase that contains its own meaning but cannot be understood in layman's language. A proverb is defined as a well-known sentence that is used to give advice to the other person. 2. An idiom has a non-literal meaning used in reading, writing, and speaking.

Do your best idiom? ›

do (one's) best. To do as well as one possibly can at something. I'm just not good at math, so, believe me, a B- in Algebra means that I've done my best. No, you're not the star player on the team, but you always do your best, which encourages the rest of us to do the same.

What is an example of idiom in a sentence? ›

Idioms exist in every language. They are words or phrases that aren't meant to be taken literally. For example, if you say someone has “cold feet,” it doesn't mean their toes are actually cold. Rather, it means they're nervous about something.

How can I learn idioms quickly? ›

  1. Try to devise its visual meaning by putting it in a sentence. Eg. ...
  2. Read the idiom again and again and try to draw a connection between the words used. ...
  3. While reading the idioms try to understand the context for which they are used, this will help you in memorizing them.
1 Dec 2020

What are idioms explain with illustrations? ›

Definition of Idiom

An idiom is an expression that takes on a figurative meaning when certain words are combined, which is different from the literal definition of the individual words. For example, let's say I said: 'Don't worry, driving out to your house is a piece of cake.

What are idioms for Class 4? ›

Idioms are a group of words whose meaning is different from the meanings of the individual words. It is an idiomatic expression. Something good that isn't recognised at first. One's intentions can be judged better by what they do than what they say.

What is an idiom 7th grade? ›

Idioms are word combinations that have a different figurative meaning than the literal meanings of each word or phrase. They can be confusing for kids or people learning a language as they don't mean what they say.

What is an idiom 4th grade? ›

An idiom is a phrase in which the meaning of each word separately does not tell the reader what the phrase means. In other words, the words in the phrase mean something more than each word alone. To figure out the meaning of an idiom, look for clues in the passage.

What are the most common phrases in English? ›

Below are 40 basic English phrases that people use every day.
...
Contents
  • Thanks so much.
  • I really appreciate…
  • Excuse me.
  • I am sorry.
  • What do you think?
  • How does that sound?
  • That sounds great.
  • (Oh,) never mind.
16 Aug 2022

What are the 20 examples of idiom? ›

Here are 20 English idioms that everyone should know:
  • Under the weather. What does it mean? ...
  • The ball is in your court. What does it mean? ...
  • Spill the beans. What does it mean? ...
  • Break a leg. What does it mean? ...
  • Pull someone's leg. What does it mean? ...
  • Sat on the fence. What does it mean? ...
  • Through thick and thin. ...
  • Once in a blue moon.
23 Feb 2022

Do our best idioms? ›

do one's best. Also, do one's level best or one's damnedest . Perform as well as one can, do the utmost possible, as in I'm doing my best to balance this statement, or She did her level best to pass the course, or He did his damnedest to get done in time.

How many idioms are there in English? ›

How many idioms are there? Wikipedia suggests that there are over 25,000 idiomatic expressions in the English language.

What is idiom give 5 examples? ›

For example, “under the weather” is an idiom universally understood to mean sick or ill. If you say you're feeling “under the weather,” you don't literally mean that you're standing underneath the rain.

What is idioms in English examples? ›

Idioms exist in every language. They are words or phrases that aren't meant to be taken literally. For example, if you say someone has “cold feet,” it doesn't mean their toes are actually cold. Rather, it means they're nervous about something.

What is an idiom for kids? ›

Idioms are phrases that have a meaning that is very different from its individual parts. Unlike most sentences that have a literal meaning, idioms have figurative meaning. A literal meaning is when each word in a sentence stays true to its actual meaning.

What is an idiom for study hard? ›

To “hit the books” – to study hard. To “learn (something) by heart” – to memorize something perfectly so that you can say it without thinking. To “pass with flying colors” – to be extremely successful; to succeed easily.

How do you study idioms? ›

  1. Try to devise its visual meaning by putting it in a sentence. Eg. ...
  2. Read the idiom again and again and try to draw a connection between the words used. ...
  3. While reading the idioms try to understand the context for which they are used, this will help you in memorizing them.
1 Dec 2020

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